Psalm 112:1 – 3 – ‘Praise the Lord. Blessed is the man who fears the Lord, who finds great delight in his commands. His children will be mighty in the land; the generation of the upright will be blessed. Wealth and riches are in his house, and his righteousness endures forever.’

I love these verses. There is such a promise in them – one that goes beyond one generation! Firstly it indicates that the person who fears the Lord (you and I) is blessed. When we find great delight in God’s commands and fear him, we are blessed. On top of this, the children of that person will also be blessed! And why is this? If you follow God reverently and teach your children to do the same, then God’s word says they will also be blessed. The generation of the upright will be blessed. As you teach your children to fear God, you are passing on the best possible thing that you can.

God's Word says the Generation of the Upright will be Blessed

God’s Word says the Generation of the Upright will be Blessed

As well as being blessed and having children who are blessed, the man who fears the Lord will also have wealth and riches in his house. How incredible!

It should be enough for us to have a saving knowledge of Christ and be in relationship with God. But on top of this, He promises to bless us and provide our house with wealth and riches, if we fear Him. Wow.

The Generation of the Upright

God wants to bless us. Furthermore, He wants to provide us with wealth and riches that we can use to do good on this earth. Don’t think that having more than enough as a Christian is wrong. Keeping it to yourself when you can bless others, is wrong, but wealth itself is not! The generation of the upright will be blessed – fear God and teach your children to do likewise.

Financial tip – compare the benefits of saving money and earning interest with keeping loans down that are incurring you interest. A mortgage may charge 5% interest while savings earn you 4% interest. It is wiser financially to put extra funds against the mortgage and save interest of 5%, rather than earn interest of 4% that ends up getting taxed.